Exploring the interplay between ortho-doxy (right belief) and ortho-praxy (right action)...

...and encouraging a life where these intertwined thoughts and deeds simply happen... by default.

26 September 2005

yokes, disciples and dust

Note: I've shamelessly 'borrowed' some of these concepts. You can find them yourself if you research Judaism. Also, Rob Bell covers them quite well in his book, "Velvet Elvis" and his Nooma DVD entitled "Dust."

Studying the Torah (first five books of the Old Testament, or the books of Moses) is an integral part of Jewish life. In Jesus' day, Jewish boys would begin Torah study around the age of six (bet sefer), and would memorize it entirely! Around age ten, while the majority of the boys would begin learning their fathers' trade, the best of these Torah students went on to study other Jewish writings and memorize the rest of the Old Testament (bet talmud)! That's right, even Psalms and Proberbs! Finally, in their early teens, the best of the best of these would apply to a rabbi's disciple (bet midrash). They didn't just want to know what the rabbi knew, they wanted to DO what the rabbi DID. If a rabbi thought the student could 'do what he did' (known as a 'yoke'), he would 'call' the student to be his disciple by saying, "Come and follow me." The student would then leave family, friends and his whole life to follow the Rabbi and take his 'yoke.' Each Rabbi's 'yoke' was shaped and influenced by the interpretations of the Scriptures that the Rabbi had, so some 'yokes' were more strict or 'heavy' than others. Following the Rabbi wherever he went inspired the Jewish blessing, "May you be covered in the dust of your Rabbi."

Jesus was a radical rabbi...

When other rabbi's looked for the cream of the crop, Jesus called fishermen and tax collectors! That's right, He called those who didn't even make it past learning the Torah! He also said that His yoke was easy, and His burden was light!

These radical actions and words of Jesus highlight His turning away from burdensome, strict, ordered processes of learning and teaching. Jesus' emphasis was on relationships. He must have believed that if His disciples loved Him, then they would be like Him!

Perhaps this sheds new light on the Great Commandment to love the Lord your God, and the Great Commission of Jesus to go and make disciples of all nations. He wants us to share a way of life with eachother and the world that He said was easy and light. He wants that way of life to flow from a relationship with Him.

Are you involved in a discipleship relationship?

May you see the importance of your relationship with Christ above all others.
May you realize the calling of Christ to disciple-making.
May you understand that this means disciple-being as well.
May you be covered in the dust of your Rabbi.

3 comments:

James H said...

Shalom Dale,

any ohev ha-shavuot ha mehina.
Ata asita ha-avoda yafa.

Toda

Anonymous said...

Dale,

Very interesting perspective about the yoke.... It helps so much to understand the history of Jewish culture here. Wow! That brings to life the phrase, "come and follow me." It helps me appreciate the fact that I don't have to memorize a bunch of laws...loving Him is all He requires.

Love,
Sis

servant said...

Hey Dale, have you seen Rob Bell's Nooma DVD "Dust"? Or read his book Velvet Elvis?