Exploring the interplay between ortho-doxy (right belief) and ortho-praxy (right action)...

...and encouraging a life where these intertwined thoughts and deeds simply happen... by default.

13 June 2006

buying identity

New Zealand is becoming more like America every minute.

And it's not a good thing.

Yet another Temple for Capitalism (a.k.a. shopping mall) has just recently had it's grand opening not far from my flat. So many people were flocking to this Marketing Mecca that traffic was jammed all opening-day long.

Lately I've been thinking more and more about how my standard of living (and all of the decisions I make to keep it in place) affects the world around me. It's not been a pleasant exercise for me. I've had to realise that many of the choices I make (most are daily) have very negative consequences. This has caused me to think more and more about many things. Take-away beverage (coffee, coke, etc.) cups, plastic shopping bags, plastic water bottles, rediculously in-efficient and wasteful product packaging, disposable goods and other such things don't just disappear when we throw them away.

Allow me to share with you some of the terminology that pushes this type of consumerism along. An article (advertisement?) in the Tamaki and Districts Times, celebrated (venerated?) stage one of the opening of the new Consumerist Worship Centre in Mt. Wellington known as Sylvia Park Shopping Centre. Here is an excerpt.

'Ultimately, Sylvia Park Shopping Centre will feature over 180 specialty stores, indoor/outdoor foodcourt, The Warehouse Extra, Foodtown and Pak n' Save, a top-line specialty fashion precinct that is set to offer consumers an unprecedented range of fashion labels from a single location, cafes, restaurants and a state of the art theatre and entertainment complex... ...Angus McNaughton says that the retail offering at Sylvia Park is the strongest and most diverse of any centre in New Zealand... ...there will be brands and stores making their debut appearance on the New Zealand market to provide shoppers at Sylvia Park with the most comprehensive fashion choices available.'

Another article features the 'new specialised retail store' Howards Storage World with this opening:

'...families strive to cope with increasing collections of electronic gadgets, toys for weekend warriors and wardrobes overflowing with clothing, shoes and accessories.'


Hmmm... Anyone see a pattern here?

The connection between our 'comprehensive fashion choices' and our 'wardrobes overflowing with clothing' is both humorous and deeply unsettling. Also unsettling are the use of the words 'strongest' and 'diverse' in a sentence about a retail centre that promotes anything but strength or diversity. True strength might help us to realise that we don't actually need any more clothes. It might begin to reveal just how obediently we are dancing to the beat of the fashion drum (which waits till sales have peaked and then changes pace to generate another peak). True diversity has nothing to do with people letting clothing manufacturers tell them what looks good and why they should dress just like everyone else.

I know we may think 'it's just business' and that it's harmless, but I think we really need to be aware of the impact that this has on our identities.

Our identities?

Yes. Our identities.

You see, if they can get us to agree with them that we are simply 'shoppers' or 'consumers' then they have succeeded in altering how we view ourselves - and our identity consists of how we view ourselves. We are not concerned with staying 'in fashion' until we are told that we need to 'make room in your wardrobe for the new season.' We are quite content with what we have until we are reminded by countless billboards, store-fronts and countless other forms of advertising that we are about to be left in the dust if we don't keep up with the times. The more I begin to see advertising and marketing for what it really is, the less I'm buying it (literally). We pray 'lead us not into temptation' but happily gaze at magazines that tell us how we ought to dress (and also 'educate' us as to how we might have 'healthier' sex lives) and walk around malls ready to give money to companies who remind us that we can't do without what they have to offer.

I'm no longer seeing these issues as spiritually neutral. I want to live my life thinking about serving others, not myself. I want my imagination to be captured by the call of the Gospel on my life, not held captive by the call of Globalist agendas. I want my identity to be informed and solidified by the Gospel of Christ, not by anything else.

May we support and encourage one another in our true identity which we could never buy, but that was bought for us with Blood so priceless it could never be sold.

1 comment:

servant said...

Was that you I saw coming out of the Warehouse at Sylvia Park this morning Dale? ;o)

Love ya!